Is hydropower 'renewable' for NH?

 read more →

The New Hampshire legislature is considering HB 143, a bill that would make large hydropower plants eligible for renewable energy subsidies.

Right now the state's Renewable Portfolio Standard requires utilities to buy a certain percentage of electricity from renewable sources, but large hydropower is not counted as renewable.  That is partly because hydropower generally does not need subsidies to succeed, and partly because large hydropower plants can disrupt the environment.

Rep. David Murotake (R-Nashua), the primary sponsor of HB 143, says his bill will lower electricity rates because hydropower is readily available and relatively cheap.

Sen. Martha Fuller Clark (D-Portsmouth) opposes the bill.  She says that hydropower would take subsidies away from other renewable energy sources that need help to grow - and the state needs those renewable sources to diversify its energy supply.

Do you think hydropower should count as renewable energy under the Renewable Portfolio Standard?  CLICK HERE to post your thoughts on our site.

CLICK HERE to read coverage from NHPR.

Join Our Community

Stand up for the LFDA mission!
 read more →

The nonpartisan, nonprofit Live Free or Die Alliance (LFDA) serves New Hampshire citizens by providing objective information about issues and candidates; promoting the civil exchange of opinions in a variety of forums, online and in person; and connecting citizens with their elected officials.

Show your support for our mission: join the LFDA community today! 

Membership is always free, and gives you posting privileges on our website.

Want to learn more about us first?  Visit our About Page to learn about our mission, our Issue pages to learn about hot topics in New Hampshire government, our Voter Resources section to learn about elected officials, or our Member Posts to see what fellow Granite Staters have to say.  And don't forget to like us on Facebook!

Bill looks to loosen gun laws

 read more →

On Thursday the Senate will hear testimony on SB 116, a bill that would allow a resident to carry a concealed firearm without a license.

Right now New Hampshire requires a license for a concealed firearm, but any resident can openly carry a visible firearm without a license.

"People have a Second Amendment right," said Sen Jeb. Bradley (R-Wolfeboro), the sponsor of the bill.  "We’re an open carry state already; I just don’t see why the distinction."

Bill opponents argue that the license to carry a concealed firearm is not an undue burden on Second Amendment rights, so there is no compelling reason to change the system.

Some law enforcement officers oppose the bill because it makes it harder to know who may be armed.

Do you think New Hampshire should scrap the license to carry a concealed firearm?  CLICK HERE to post your thoughts on our site.

CLICK HERE to learn more about gun laws in New Hampshire.

CLICK HERE to read coverage from the Concord Monitor.

Think tank: policies should age

 read more →

On Monday Steve Norton, executive director of the N.H. Center for Public Policy Studies, told House budget writers that most New Hampshire policy is based on an outdated picture of the state.

Norton pointed to New Hampshire's aging population as the biggest change.  Two decades ago young families were moving to New Hampshire; now young people are leaving the state.  By 2040, roughly one-fifth of the population is projected to be older than 75.

"2012 is fundamentally different than 1990, and you’re going to have to fundamentally change public policy if you want economic growth," said Norton.

Norton encouraged policymakers to consider the impact of fewer elementary and high school students, more residents in nursing homes, and growth in social services and the health care industry.

Norton was invited to testify as part of the House budget writing process.  The House has to send its proposed budget to the Senate by April 2.

How do you think budget writers should account for the aging population?  CLICK HERE to post your thoughts on our site.

CLICK HERE to learn more about New Hampshire's aging population.

CLICK HERE to read coverage from the Union Leader.

NH considers EBT restrictions

 read more →

This year the state legislature is considering two bills that would limit the use of electronic benefit transfer (EBT) cards.  EBT cards are used to distribute welfare benefits.

HB 219, a House bill, would prohibit the use of EBT cards at tattoo parlors, smoke shops, and marijuana dispensaries.  Existing regulation already prohibits the use of EBT cards at liquor stores, casinos, and strip clubs.

SB 169, a Senate bill, would prohibit the use of EBT cards for alcohol, tobacco, gambling, lottery tickets, tattoos, firearms, or adult entertainment.  SB 169 would also limit the use of cash withdrawn from EBT cards at ATMs, although that cash is very difficult to track.  SB 169 also carries harsher penalties than the House bill.

MaryLou Beaver, New England director for the nonprofit Every Child Matters, worked with a committee of legislators last summer to study EBT restrictions.  She supports the House bill, but opposes the Senate bill because of the harsh penalties.

"In [the Senate] bill, you are penalized the first time by losing two pay periods, the second time by losing four and the third time by losing six. At that point, you have just created homelessness for an entire family," said Beaver.

Sen. Jeanie Forrester (R-Meredith), the sponsor of SB 169, sees the Senate bill as a way to ensure children are getting their family's benefits.

"If there are people not using the money the way it's supposed to be used, the family is not getting the nutritional food they need, and the limited resources we have as a state are not going to people who are really in need," said Forrester.

Do you support HB 219 or SB 169?  CLICK HERE to post your thoughts on our site.

CLICK HERE to learn more about the debate over welfare restrictions in New Hampshire.

CLICK HERE to read coverage from the Union Leader.

2015 bill reports!

Browse bills by category read more →

Did you know New Hampshire legislators have requested roughly 800 bills for 2015?  As a service to our members, the non-partisan, non-profit Live Free or Die Alliance (LFDA) has divided those bills into forty-one browsable categories.

CLICK HERE to browse bill requests by category.

The LFDA will update our reports on a weekly basis.

Is hydropower 'renewable' for NH?

Join Our Community

Bill looks to loosen gun laws

Think tank: policies should age

NH considers EBT restrictions

2015 bill reports!

Political Tracker
 
NHGOP to host 2016 presidential candidate summit

NH1 — 1/29/2015

Mark off April 17-18 on your calendar! That's when the New Hampshire Republican Party will be hosting some of the potential 2016 GOP presidential candidates at a "First in the Nation Republican Leadership Summit."
Read More... 

 
House considering bill to create residency guidelines for voters

LFDA Virtual Town Hall -- 1/29/15

House lawmakers are considering a measure that aims to create guidelines for election officials to judge a voters domicile. And the secretary of state’s office supports the bill.

Read More...


 
Domestic violence advocates criticize House bill
View More Videos....
Issue Tracker
Family Planning in NH  
Family Planning in NH 

A group of Republican representatives and anti-abortion advocates went before the House Judiciary Committee to urge the adoption of a law that would support the notion that life begins at conception. The debate coincided with the 42nd anniversary of Roe v. Wade.
Learn More About the Issue...

Minimum Wage  
Minimum Wage 

Rep. Jackie Cilley (D-Strafford) has filed legislation to raise the state's minimum wage over a three-year period. New Hampshire's goes by the federally set minimum of $7.25 an hour; under Cilley's bill, it would reach to $14.25 by 2018.
Learn More About the Issue...

The Affordable Care Act and NH  
The Affordable Care Act and NH 

According to the federal government, more than 46,000 New Hampshire residents have signed up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act in the first two months of the second enrollment period, which continues through February 15.
Learn More About the Issue...

This is a Popup Ad and corresponding javascript. Please edit in HTML mode!

In The NH News

Join the Discussion on Facebook
Andrew Wood
Are we really questioning whether or not to abandon a program that helps reduce climate change-causing emissions?

The financial impact is effectively irrelevant. We must divest from fossil fuels, or there will be no world left to finance.
Cody MacGregor
Leave, it will drop our electrical bills. Especially with limited facts as to whether this helps reduce "climate change" at all. Save us money, and stop the propaganda machine on climate change.
View all comments on this post

Follow Us on Twitter