NH breaks ground on women's prison

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This week New Hampshire broke ground for the new women's prison in Concord.

In August 2012 four women prisoners filed a lawsuit charging that New Hampshire provides unequal services for male and female inmates.  That lawsuit was suspended after the legislature approved $38 million for a new women's prison.

By siting the new women's prison near the men's prison, the state aims to share some prison personnel and save money on staffing.

However, New Hampshire's prison system is already suffering a shortage of staff. 

"It’s not enough to build this new facility," said Sen. Sylvia Larsen.  "The legislature must fund the additional staff necessary to meet the security, programming, and treatment needs of these women."

Do you have an opinion on the new women's prison?  CLICK HERE to post your thoughts on our site.

CLICK HERE to learn more about the challenges of prison reform in New Hampshire.

CLICK HERE to read coverage from NHPR.

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The nonpartisan, nonprofit Live Free or Die Alliance (LFDA) serves New Hampshire citizens by providing objective information about issues and candidates; promoting the civil exchange of opinions in a variety of forums, online and in person; and connecting citizens with their elected officials.

Show your support for our mission: join the LFDA community today! 

Membership is always free, and gives you posting privileges on our website.

Want to learn more about us first?  Visit our About Page to learn about our mission, our Issue pages to learn about hot topics in New Hampshire government, our Voter Resources section to learn about elected officials, or our Member Posts to see what fellow Granite Staters have to say.  And don't forget to like us on Facebook!

Hassan: business taxes a problem

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According to a press release from Gov. Maggie Hassan (D), changes to business taxes and the interest and dividends tax are to blame for revenue shortfalls in 2014.

"Shortfalls in revenues from business taxes and the interest and dividends tax make it increasingly clear that the changes made to the tax code by the last Legislature are having a negative impact on the state's budget," said Hassan.

Gov. Hassan said her office was analyzing the changes, but did not specify which changes are of greatest concern.

Business owners may alternatively see the lower tax burden as a positive development.

The restructuring of the Medicaid Enhancement Tax also significantly impacted this year's tax revenues.

Meanwhile Hassan continues to advocate for a casino as a solution to the revenue shortfalls.

Casino opponents point to the recent casino closings in Atlantic City as evidence there is saturation in the market, making casinos an unwise investment.

Do you have an opinion on New Hampshire's budget?  CLICK HERE to post your thoughts on our site.

CLICK HERE to learn more about the current state budget.

CLICK HERE to read coverage from Seacoast Online.

Changes to firearm license application?

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Gun rights advocates are angry about changes to the application to carry a concealed firearm in New Hampshire. 

The Department of Safety made several changes to the application, adding new questions and removing some language. 

For example, the form now asks if any government agency or licensing authority has ever claimed the applicant is prohibited from possessing a firearm.  Gun rights advocates say that question is vague and impossible to answer accurately. 

Second Amendment supporters also argue that changes to the application should have gone through a formal rule-making process, including legislative input.

Assistant Commissioner of Safety Earl Sweeney says the form was changed in response to a state Supreme Court decision that affirmed law enforcement officers have discretion over determining the "suitability" of an applicant.

The changes were meant to help law enforcement officers exercise that discretion, but Sweeney agrees that some of the questions are poorly worded.  He doesn't believe a time-consuming rule-making process is necessary to make more changes.

Should the Department of Safety get approval from the legislature before changing the application for a firearm license?  CLICK HERE to answer the question on our Facebook page.

CLICK HERE to learn more about firearms regulations in New Hampshire.

CLICK HERE to read coverage from the Union Leader.

State finds EEE-positive mosquitoes

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A batch of mosquitoes from Londonderry are the first to test positive for Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) in New Hampshire this year.

Health officials say this is roughly when mosquitoes first tested positive for EEE last year.

"Since we know that the agents that cause these diseases are here in New England, everyone should make it part of their routine to take precautions every time they go outside," said Public Health Director Dr. Jose Montero.

Some towns have gone a step further and started spraying pesticides in June.

Supporters of pesticide treatments point out that New Hampshire has seen more mosquitoes testing positive for EEE over the past two years. 

Opponents of pesticide treatments point out that EEE is very rare, while the negative effect of pesticides on the environment - and sometimes humans - is well known.

Would you support pesticide treatments in your town?  CLICK HERE to post your thoughts on our site.

CLICK HERE to read coverage from WMUR.

Grassroots Group: Sell Schiller

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A grassroots organization on the Seacoast is calling for Public Service of New Hampshire (PSNH) to sell its fossil fuel power plants.

Portsmouth-based Citizens for Clean & Fair Power is particularly focused on the impact Schiller Station - a coal, oil, and biomass plant - has on the health of residents and the environment.

This year the state legislature passed a bill that gives the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) the power to compel Public Service of New Hampshire (PSNH) to sell its power plants.  That bill was prompted by the cost to ratepayers for maintaining the older fossil fuel plants.

However, PSNH argues that its fossil fuel power plants are needed to meet demand during peak times, such as during heatwaves.  The fossil fuel plants also keep the energy market diverse.

Do you think PSNH should sell its fossil fuel plants?  CLICK HERE to post your thoughts on our site.

CLICK HERE to learn more about related issues at the coal power plant in Bow, New Hampshire.

CLICK HERE to read coverage from Seacoast Online.

NH breaks ground on women's prison

Join Our Community

Hassan: business taxes a problem

Changes to firearm license application?

State finds EEE-positive mosquitoes

Grassroots Group: Sell Schiller

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In The NH News

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Ruth Larrabee Kevghas
As far as the Governors go- they are concerned and rightly so- it is affecting their communities! And the potential is there to have many displaced workers which will definitely affect their states labor force!
Jim Meatty
Don't they have more important issues to work on aside from a family squabble? And given Patrick's wife was one of artie s' lawyers that helped start the whole mess he really needs to stay out
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