NH: highest rate of breast cancer?

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According to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, New Hampshire has the highest rate of breast cancer in the United States.

Nancy Ryan, President of the New Hampshire Breast Cancer Coalition, told NHPR that the high breast cancer rate may be due to more active screening.

"It could be that we’re just doing a really good job in relation to the other states in screening mammograms," said Ryan. "The more you screen women, the more breast cancer you will find."

Breast cancer is also most prevalent among white women, and New Hampshire is one of the whitest states in the nation.

However, Ryan acknowledged that there may be some unknown environmental connection or other cause for the high breast cancer rate in New Hampshire.

Do you think New Hampshire government should investigate possible causes for the high rate of breast cancer?  CLICK HERE to post your thoughts on our site.

CLICK HERE to read coverage from NHPR.

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Stand up for the LFDA mission!
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The nonpartisan, nonprofit Live Free or Die Alliance (LFDA) serves New Hampshire citizens by providing objective information about issues and candidates; promoting the civil exchange of opinions in a variety of forums, online and in person; and connecting citizens with their elected officials.

Show your support for our mission: join the LFDA community today! 

Membership is always free, and gives you posting privileges on our website.

Want to learn more about us first?  Visit our About Page to learn about our mission, our Issue pages to learn about hot topics in New Hampshire government, our Voter Resources section to learn about elected officials, or our Member Posts to see what fellow Granite Staters have to say.  And don't forget to like us on Facebook!

Hassan: raise minimum wage

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On Friday Gov. Maggie Hassan (D) gave a state of the state speech to the Tri-Chambers of Commerce in Dover.  After the address an audience member asked if she supported a minimum wage increase.

"I think it's really important that working families can afford a quality of living that doesn't make them eligible for state services," Hassan replied. "Right now there are working families in the state who need food stamps. I mean, these are people working 40 hours plus a week and who qualify for Medicaid."

In 2014 the state House of Representatives passed HB 1403, a bill to raise the minimum wage to $9 per hour, and link yearly minimum wage increases to the cost of living index.  The Senate killed the bill.

Opponents of a minimum wage increase argued that businesses would hire fewer minimum wage workers if they were forced to increase pay.  Opponents also argued that minimum wage jobs are meant to be entry-level positions for students and other individuals looking for supplementary income.

The minimum wage issue is likely to make a return in the 2015 and/or 2016 legislative sessions.

Do you think New Hampshire should raise the minimum wage?  CLICK HERE to post your thoughts on our site.

CLICK HERE to learn more about the pros and cons of a minimum wage increase.

CLICK HERE to read coverage from Foster's Daily Democrat.

Should NH broaden "farm stand" definition?

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Some legislators are advocating for a broader definition of a "farm stand" in New Hampshire.

State law allows farmers to sell their food at on-site farm stands with relatively few regulations.  However, some farmers in remote locations find it difficult to draw shoppers to their farm stands.  Those farmers want to sell their food off-site, without triggering retail store regulations.

HB 1382, currently in a study committee, would broaden the legal definition of a farm stand to allow off-site farm stands within a fifty mile radius of the farm.  The law would require clear labels for any farm food.

Supporters of HB 1382 argue that the bill will boost the farm economy while increasing opportunities for consumers to eat locally.

Opponents argue that when food is sold off-farm, consumers do not have the same ability to judge the trustworthiness of the farm.  Therefore, the state should apply the stricter food safety regulations associated with retail stores whenever farms sell food off-site.

Do you think New Hampshire should allow farms to sell food off-site, without applying retail store regulations?  CLICK HERE to post your thoughts on our site.

CLICK HERE to read coverage from NHPR.

Ayotte sponsors "spice" bill

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Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R) is co-sponsoring a bill to increase federal regulation of "spice," a form of synthetic marijuana.

Spice products are marketed as potpourri or incense.  However, the flakes are sprayed with a synthetic compound similar to THC, the drug found in marijuana.  The federal government has difficulty regulating synthetic drugs because manufacturers constantly tweak the chemical formulas to bypass regulation.

Ayotte's bill would form a task force of scientists to create a comprehensive list of chemicals equivalent to controlled drugs.  The bill would then ban any import of those controlled substance equivalents, unless intended for non-human use.

"New Hampshire has seen a troubling increase in spice overdoses during the past few months, especially among young people in our state," Ayotte said in a statement.  "We need to reverse this alarming trend and this bipartisan bill is an important step forward in helping law enforcement crack down on dangerous synthetic drugs."

Opponents argue that another drug ban will not decrease drug use, but will instead funnel drug users to new and potentially more dangerous drugs.  Others argue that the government should actively legalize and regulate synthetic marijuana products and/or natural marijuana.

Do you support Ayotte's bill to regulate spice products?  CLICK HERE to post your thoughts on our site.

CLICK HERE to learn about the related issue of marijuana decriminalization.

CLICK HERE to read coverage from the Union Leader.

NH food stamp cuts avoidable?

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This year federal legislators closed a "loophole" in food stamp benefits that allowed recipients to receive additional food assistance, so long as they applied for at least $1 in heating assistance.  Now food stamp recipients must receive at least $20 a year in heating assistance to qualify for additional food stamps.

According to a report from Seacoast Online, New Hampshire is one of only four states that is affected by the change.  Many other states have committed to paying the higher heating assistance to maintain higher food stamp benefits.

Terry Smith, director of New Hampshire's family assistance programs, said New Hampshire decided the limited money for heating assistance was better spent helping those families who truly need the heat.

However, others argue that New Hampshire should protect its most vulnerable residents from food stamp cuts, which average $90 per month per household.

Do you think New Hampshire should redistribute heating assistance to cancel food stamp cuts?  CLICK HERE to post your thoughts on our site.

CLICK HERE
to read coverage from Seacoast Online.

NH: highest rate of breast cancer?

Join Our Community

Hassan: raise minimum wage

Should NH broaden "farm stand" definition?

Ayotte sponsors "spice" bill

NH food stamp cuts avoidable?

Political Tracker
 
Brown disagrees with GOP 'personhood' plank

NHPR — 9/23/2014

Scott Brown, the GOP’s nominee for US senate, disagrees with a change the New Hampshire Republican party made to its platform last weekend.
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Hillary Clinton to attend event for NH state senator

LFDA Virtual Town Hall — 9/23/2014

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will raise campaign money for New Hampshire state Senator Lou D'Allesandro.

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Havenstein ad claims economy has stagnated
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Issue Tracker
The Affordable Care Act and NH  
The Affordable Care Act and NH 

MapNH Health, produced by the New Hampshire Citizens Health Initiative, indicates that the state's overall age ratio - the number of people under age 20 and over 64 to the working-age population - will rise from about 60 percent in 2010 to about 90 in 2030.
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Northern Pass  
Northern Pass 

The New England Power Generators Association, which represents regional power plants, filed a request for regulators to review the relationship of the Northern Pass to PSNH to determine if the project is receiving inappropriate subsidies from the company.
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Marijuana Decriminalization  
Marijuana Decriminalization 

As a committee looks at ways to curb synthetic marijuana use, lab tests show that 75 percent of samples of the substance (up from 30 to 50 percent) contain Schedule I drugs, those defined as ones with no accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.
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Joe Turcotte
We should be arming the kurdish fighters and working with the un to establish an independent and sovereign Kurdistan.
Gregory Smith
I don't believe there is such a thing as a "moderate" Syrian rebel. They all hate us. In fact it's so bad that leaving Assad in power might actually be our best option.
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