Geese Culling - Issue Summary

Should authorities euthanize geese when public health is threatened?

culling geeseBy: LFDA Editor

Canada geese are creating problems in some communities, fouling public areas and water supplies, even threatening air traffic. Some communities, with the help of a federal agency, solve the problem by killing the geese. Is this a reasonable solution?


In New Hampshire, according to statistics cited by the Eagle Tribune, the resident Canada geese population rose roughly 50% from 1997-2010.

The Humane Society says "Canada geese are traditionally associated with lakes and ponds, but they also spend time on land and will nest some distance from water if the site seems safe. Artificial ponds and lakes, storm water impoundments, and vast expanses of good grazing surfaces typical of municipal parks, corporate and school campuses, golf courses, and other human-built environments are ideal habitat for geese. This is the main reason they have settled in to year-round residency and have grown in numbers in suburban and urban areas."

"A Canada goose produces a minimum of a half to one pound of feces per day, per bird," said Carol Bannerman, public affairs at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services. That can create environmental and aesthetic problems.

The birds are a federally protected wildlife species and New Hampshire Fish and Game does not handle nuisance issues. That chore goes to the USDA.

The USDA recommends ways to discourage geese from an area (a no-feeding policy in public parks, for example) and tries to relocate them; the agency only agrees to culling them when no other means work.

New Hampshire also has a Canada goose hunting season in September, with a daily bag limit of five and a possession limit of 10.

What's the proper course of action here? Should authorities euthanize geese when public health is threatened?

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  • Contact a government official as follows:

1. Contact members of the New Hampshire House of Representatives or the New Hampshire Senate

2. Give your opinion to Governor Maggie Hassan

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Should authorities euthanize geese?  Whatever your thoughts are, we urge you to make your voice heard. See the "Learn More/Take Action" section on this page for more information.

Issue Status

Canada goose culling, or euthanasia via gas or gunshot, is allowed only by federal permit, though a limited number of "resident" geese (ones that do not return to Canada) may be hunted for 60 days in the fall. The "bag limit" is two geese per day. No change in policy is evident.

News

There are no 2014 articles on this topic.

December 14, 2013
Valley News: Canada geese hunt can be tricky
September 14, 2013
Citizen of Laconia: Resident geese: It's all about the numbers
August 26, 2013
Union Leader: Atkinson condo complex uses coyote decoys to ward off geese
July 31, 2013
Foster's Daily Democrat: Milton Town Beach still closed to swimmers, new tests may lift ban soon, problem blamed on geese in water
July 23, 2013
WMUR: Tips to keeping Canada geese off your property
September 21, 2012
Foster's Daily Democrat: Waterfowl hunting continues at Great Bay wildlife refuge
September 4. 2012

Boston.com: Canada geese season opens in NH
August 15, 2012
Boston.com: NH Fish and Game hold waterfowl hearing
April 9, 2012
Union Leader: Waterfowl hunters slowed by 'no-winter' weather
February 12, 2012
Concord Monitor: Feds OK snow geese 'harvest,' though birds rare in NH
June 21, 2011
Union Leader: Feds: Geese kill-offs less likely this year
June 26, 2010
Concord Monitor: Geese culled; neighbors protest tactic